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Student Reviews

Find informative student essays about arts and cultural events, institutions, and internships. Read what your fellow students have to say about the arts, or add your voice.

Let your creative voice out, and join our writing team! We encourage submissions about current museum exhibitions, dance and theater performances, or talks and lectures. For more information on contributing a review, email Rebecca Popp, Associate Director for Program Administration, at: rp2077@columbia.edu

In the sleek, modern environment of the Museum of Arts and Design, the exhibit Swept Away provides a fascinating and welcome contrast. Comprising works made with dust and dirt as their primary components, artists from various media and backgrounds provided a refreshingly diverse array of perspectives on this most elemental yet often dismissed material.
Reviewed:
El Museo del Barrio
Looking over the pieces on display at El Museo del Barrio, I was struck by a couple different observations setting the currentTestimonios: 100 Years of Popular Expression exhibit apart from most other museum exhibits I’ve seen.
Reviewed:
The Paley Center for Media
One of the most fascinating parts of the prevalence of the world of social networking and online, user-generated media is the effect it seems to be having on artists and the type of media used to create art. Digital media is so widely used that the technical knowledge of these tools seems an integral part of developing a technique as a 21st century artist.
Reviewed:
New York Transit Museum
The crowd at the latest New York Transit Museum event was certainly a niche audience. City planners, software developers, MTA employees and subway enthusiasts filed into the room, awaiting a discussion of some of the most prescient technology in our everyday lives – the 100-plus year-old New York Subway and the connection of MTA scheduling and announcements with smartphones.
Reviewed:
Asia Society
Perhaps the most surreal aspect of immersing oneself into the art and culture of a long-forgotten empire, while residing in New York City in 2012, is the thought that one day, people will look back on our society much the same way. I tend to forget how relatively recent our industrial, technology-driven culture truly is.
Reviewed:
International Center of Photography
Part of the mission statement of the International Center of Photography is to propagate society’s appreciation of photography and the role it plays in our modern lives. Visiting the ICP for the first time, that message comes across loud and clear. There is so much power in the intricate wealth of information held in a photograph.
Reviewed:
Asia Society
Perhaps the most surreal aspect of immersing oneself into the art and culture of a long-forgotten empire, while residing in New York City in 2012, is the thought that one day, people will look back on our society much the same way. I tend to forget how relatively recent our industrial, technology-driven culture truly is.
Reviewed:
National Academy Museum
Founded in 1825, The National Academy integrates a museum, art school, and an honorary association of artists and architects “dedicated to creating and preserving a living history of American Art.” The museum is housed in the Beaux Arts townhouse, which was built in 1901 and was the residence of the philanthropist Archer M. Huntington.
Reviewed:
MoMA PS1
Last Monday I headed to Queens to visit MoMA PS1. I had heard of PS1 a few times, but had never made the effort to actually go. It was in Queens after all. The good news is that the trip is not complicated or overly long, and is definitely worth it for the unique experience PS1 offers. Some advice for Google Maps users though, if you plan on traveling from Columbia by subway do not trust Google’s directions.
Reviewed:
Japan Society
What do you do when you come home from work to find your spouse and child taken hostage? In Hideki Noda’s The Bee, Mr. Ido, a Japanese businessman, is faced with just that question. Ido’s reaction takes him to some very dark emotional places, leading him to do things neither the audience nor Ido himself had expected.

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