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When
July 31, 2017 to January 7, 2018

Where

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
at 82nd Street
New York  New York  10028
United States
212-535-7710
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

World War I and the Visual Arts

Image: Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (British, 1889–1946). Returning to the Trenches (detail), 1916. Drypoint, plate: 6 x 8 1/16 in. (15.2 x 20.4 cm); sheet: 8 3/8 x 11 in. (21.3 x 28 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 1968 (68.510.3)

Organized to commemorate the anniversary of World War I, this exhibition will focus on the impact of the war on the visual arts. Moving chronologically from its outbreak to the decade after the armistice, World War I and the Visual Arts will highlight the diverse ways artists represented the horrors of modern warfare. The works on view will reflect a variety of responses, ranging from nationalist enthusiasm to a more somber reflection on the carnage and mass devastation that resulted.

The exhibition, drawn mainly from the collection of The Met and supplemented with select loans, will include prints, drawings, photographs, illustrated books, posters, periodicals, World War I trading cards from the Museum's celebrated Burdick Collection, and other documentary material. This exhibition will reveal how artists—including Otto Dix, C.R.W. Nevinson, George Grosz, Käthe Kollwitz, Fernand Léger, Gino Severini, and Edward Steichen—reflected a myriad of styles, approaches, ideologies, and mediums in response to the war and how it influenced modern art.