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When
Fri, Jun 17, 2016 9:00pm –
Sat, Jun 18, 2016 2:00pm –
Sat, Jun 18, 2016 5:00pm –
Sat, Jun 18, 2016 9:00pm –
Sun, Jun 19, 2016 2:00pm –
Where

The Flamboyan Theater - The Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural Center
107 Suffolk St
New York, NY NY 10002
United States

Nick Robertson Productions

Dido The Queen: A Folk Opera

Dido, a young queen in the midst of building the city of Carthage, is thrown into turmoil when the brave and handsome warrior Aeneas lands on her shores. Initially rejecting his advances, her ever-observing court coaxes her into a relationship with the visitor for their own enjoyment. After a very swift and public romance, the lovers are split by a jealous and conniving Sorceress, driving Dido and all of Carthage to a tragic end.

Originally produced at a London school for girls in 1689, 'Dido and Aeneas' has always been an ideal drama for teen audiences, yet is now relegated to the professional opera world, arguably distant from today's youth. The story revolves around a young and powerful woman who falls into a downward spiral because her community, which is so quick to give her their opinions and advice, is unable to back up their words with any modicum of support. Dogged by complete emotional overload, a total lack of privacy, and no one to rely on, she is compelled to escape her circumstances through suicide. Its not how we want the story to end and yet, we see stories just like this ending just this way for teens all over the country on a too regular basis. Its the creative team's hope that Dido the Queen will give young people an opportunity to reflect on this issue and a forum to begin conversations about very serious and real dangers facing their community.

Dido the Queen is a complex show aimed at young adults in grades 9-12 which runs about an hour in length, featuring a live band, incredible performers, and stunning visual effects from start to finish. Workshopped at New York University during the summer of 2015, this full production is made possible with generous funding from the Steinhardt School of Culture Education and Human Development Challenge Grant and The Speranza Foundation's Lincoln City Fellowship Grant.